EPLEY MANEUVER PATIENT HANDOUT PDF

Shaina McQuilkie Updated on: 1. We have done a lot of research and collected the most important pieces of information about this effective and simple exercise that is capable of solving your vertigo problem once and for all. As a bonus, you will find a great infographic at the end of this post describing every little detail of the exercise. We hope you will be satisfied with this article and leave with no questions - ready to heal your BPPV.

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Shaina McQuilkie Updated on: 1. We have done a lot of research and collected the most important pieces of information about this effective and simple exercise that is capable of solving your vertigo problem once and for all.

As a bonus, you will find a great infographic at the end of this post describing every little detail of the exercise. We hope you will be satisfied with this article and leave with no questions - ready to heal your BPPV. Note: full step-by-step info-graphic describing every detail of performing Epley Maneuver is at the bottom of this post.

This condition can be frustrating to deal with and can drastically affect your quality of life. Vertigo is categorized as either central or peripheral. Generally, central vertigo is usually more serious and peripheral vertigo is more benign in nature.

BPPV is caused by displaced otoconia small particles of calcium, sometimes referred to as otoliths. These otoconia are ordinarily attached to the utricle membrane in the ear. Trauma, aging, and infection can cause the otoliths to detach from the utricle.

Once the otoliths become detached, they accumulate within the semicircular canal. The posterior semicircular canal is the most commonly affected canal, followed by the lateral horizontal , and rarely, the superior anterior canal. Head movement cause the otoliths to trigger receptors in the semicircular canal that send faulty signals to the brain resulting in vertigo and nystagmus abnormal eye movements.

Lifetime prevalence rates have been reported to be approximately 2. The characteristic symptom of BPPV is intermittent vertigo a sensation of spinning that is brought on by a change in head position with respect to gravity i.

Vertigo typically resolves within 30 seconds for individuals with posterior canal BPPV. In patients with horizontal canal BPPV, the vertigo can last upwards of a minute. However, some patients may have nonspecific dizziness, lightheadedness, postural instability, and nausea.

While symptoms typically resolve spontaneously within 2 weeks, they may last up to several months in some individuals. BPPV typically occur in clusters and symptoms tend to recur after periods of remission. A positive Dix-Hallpike test will show features of positional nystagmus. It is important to note that the Dix-Hallpike test will not have positive findings in patients with anterior or horizontal semicircular canal BPPV.

Typically, the nystagmus presents after a few seconds and fatigues after approximately seconds. Further, the nystagmus adapts with repetitive testing, resulting in a less vigorous response. What Is the Epley Maneuver? The sometimes referred to as canalith repositioning is named after Dr. John Epley, and is procedure that uses a series of head movements to treat posterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo BPPV.

The Epley maneuver is based on the canalithiasis theory and involves rotating the posterior semicircular canal backwards, close to its planar orientation. This position uses gravitational forces to help direct canaliths out of the posterior canal, back into the utricle, where they no longer interfere with the dynamics of the semicircular canal.

Originally, the Epley maneuver involved sedation and mechanical skull vibrations ; however, a modified Epley maneuver has been developed that does not utilized skull vibrations or sedation. The modified version of the Epley maneuver has been shown to be equally effective and easier to administer compared to the original technique. How is the Epley Maneuver Performed? During treatment, each head position is held until nystagmus resolves, or for at least 30 seconds. Movements between each position are rapid.

During the Epley maneuver, you may experience vertigo, as well as nausea and possibly vomiting. The rules: The patient starts sitting upright with their head turned 45 degrees to the affected side. They are laid backward with their head hanging about 30 degrees over the edge of the couch and the affected ear to the ground. Next, their head is rotated by 90 degrees to face the opposite side.

The head is held here as the patient rolls their body onto its side. The head is rotated so they are facing downward with their nose 45 degrees below horizontal. The patient sits up sideways keeping the head in position. After treatment, you may have a sensation of light-headedness and have slight difficulty with balancing for a few days after treatment. In some cases, your practitioner may recommend that you continue to perform the Epley maneuver at home, especially if you do not respond to a single treatment, or if you have frequent recurrence of your BPPV symptoms.

For patients that continue with the maneuver at home, an aid may be recommended in some cases for conducting the treatment yourself. The DizzyFix , for example, is a device worn to help you perform the Epley maneuver properly. This video has been viewed over a million times and shows a physical therapist using the Epley maneuver on a patient experiencing BPPV. If your practitioner advises you to continue with the Epley maneuver at home, take a look at this video that explains how to perform the home Epley maneuver step by step for the treatment of posterior canal BPPV.

It is important to note that the Epley maneuver is only effective for treating BPPV of the posterior semicircular canal. If you have used the Epley maneuver and your symptoms persist, your BPPV may be affecting a different semicircular canal, or your vertigo may be caused by another condition. It is best to be re-evaluated by your practitioner to determine further treatment options.

Effectiveness of Epley Maneuver High success rates have been found with the Epley maneuver, dating back to the initial use of this procedure by Epley. In , Nunez, Cass, and Furman found complete symptom resolution in Reinink et.

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The Epley manoeuvre

What is the Epley maneuver? The Epley maneuver is an exercise you can do at home to relieve dizziness caused by benign paroxysmal positional vertigo BPPV. BPPV is caused by a problem with the inner ear. Calcium crystals called canaliths can end up in the semicircular canals. If these crystals become dislodged and move around, they can cause the sensation that the world is spinning or moving, also known as vertigo. The Epley maneuver, however, can dislodge these crystals and remove them from the semicircular canals. The Epley maneuver is often effective for many patients with BPPV, especially in cases where certain head movements seem to trigger vertigo.

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Epley Maneuver

Print What is the home Epley maneuver? The home Epley maneuver is a type of exercise help that helps to treat the symptoms of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo BPPV. You can do this exercise at home. BPPV is caused by a problem in your inner ear. Your semicircular canals are found inside your ear. They detect motion and send this information to your brain.

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Thursday, December 24, As the world turns One of the more challenging aspects of working with patients with dizziness issues is trying to gain an understanding of what they are experiencing. My experience began while bow hunting with a few of my compadres in Buffalo County. Awakening early in the morning getting ready for the trek up the mountain to the ridgetop, I grabbed my water bottle to take a drink. As I tipped my head back to take a swig, I experienced an immediate sense of spinning and imbalance. My eyes felt like they were being pulled off to the side, and it was hard to focus. I felt weird.

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