LEONORA SANSAY SECRET HISTORY PDF

Cape Francois. We arrived safely here, my dear friend, after a passage of forty days, during which I suffered horribly from sea-sickness, heat and confinement; but the society of my fellow-passengers was so agreeable that I often forgot the inconvenience to which I was exposed. It consisted of five or six French families who, having left St. Domingo at the beginning of the revolution, were now returning full of joy at the idea of again possessing the estates from which they had been driven by their revolted slaves. Buoyed by their newly awakened hopes they were all delightful anticipation.

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Some of my ideas are a little diffuse at the moment and I may be trying to accomplish too much in this paper but as always constructive criticism and other secondary source suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

Domingo, Leonora Sansay complicates our understanding of the Haitian revolution as a colonial race war by foregrounding gender relations and narratives of domestic violence. In my paper I am interested in exploring how male-female relations are politicized in the novel, how they are shaped by colonial power structures and deeply implicated in the colonial project.

The prospect of participating in such a social engagement seems to enable Clara to physically overcome her yellow fever and emotional depression. Mary further emphasizes that this is the first time Clara appears to be truly happy since their arrival on the island. Despite the constant uprisings and threats from Haitian revolutionaries, Sansay suggests that these extravagant displays of wealth, fashion, and culture are necessary to uphold a sense of European supremacy and indeed a means for the French to convince themselves of their ability to recapture their colonial possessions.

Sansay presents the courtships that occur in the ballroom as a revealing lens for understanding the broader revolutionary conflicts of the times. Here, the deliberate embroiling of the rhetoric of colonial conquest in situations of courtship and romance compels a political reading of these lines.

Mary critiques the French for being totally absorbed in the fantasy of European white supremacy and failing to recognize the precariousness of their situation, an insight made possible by her position as an American woman in Haiti. In the novel, Rochambeau uses unsafe wartime circumstances as an excuse to lure Clara to his home and later imposes an embargo to prevent her from leaving the island.

Sansay therefore re-writes women into the colonial race narrative of the Haitian revolution, not as simply subjects of private domestic abuse but rather figures of public, political consequence. In my paper, however, I want to shift the focus to a more nuanced analysis of the complex and highly antagonistic female relations depicted at the beginning of the novel, which can be problematically overlooked if we too readily embrace the feminist fantasy Sansay leaves us with.

The Secret History does not present the Haitian revolution as merely a racial, colonial conflict or even a simple battle between the sexes. Sansay also vividly describes the brutal acts of violence that women commit against each one another. Jeremy D. In my paper I intend to examine the colonial structures that fuel the murderous jealousy and ruthless competition between the women in Haiti. Works Consulted Buck-Morss, Susan.

Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, Annotation Dillon, Elizabeth Maddock. Annotation Drexler, Michael J. Fischer, Sibylle. Durham: Duke University Press, Annotation Gaul, Theresa Strouth. Popkin, Jeremy D. Annotation Trouillot, Michel-Rolph. Boston: Beacon Press, Annotation Woertendyke, Gretchen.

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Secret History; Or, the Horrors of St. Domingo and Laura

Some of my ideas are a little diffuse at the moment and I may be trying to accomplish too much in this paper but as always constructive criticism and other secondary source suggestions will be greatly appreciated. Domingo, Leonora Sansay complicates our understanding of the Haitian revolution as a colonial race war by foregrounding gender relations and narratives of domestic violence. In my paper I am interested in exploring how male-female relations are politicized in the novel, how they are shaped by colonial power structures and deeply implicated in the colonial project. The prospect of participating in such a social engagement seems to enable Clara to physically overcome her yellow fever and emotional depression.

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Leonora Sansay

The republication of these works will contribute to a significant revision of thinking about early American literary history. This Broadview edition offers a rich selection of contextual materials, including selections from periodical literature about Haiti, engravings, letters written by Sansay to her friend Aaron Burr, historical material related to the Burr trial for treason, and excerpts from literature referenced in the novels. The appendices gather together for the first time letters between Sansay and Aaron Burr, as well as news reports of the Haitian Revolution in the U. These appendices alone constitute a repository of materials that will offer scholars and students everything needed for an interdisciplinary course on romance and race—with Haiti as rightful progenitor and ancestor spirit. This edition places issues of Atlantic race slavery, republican revolution, colonialism, and gender relations squarely at the center of early American literature and culture and makes readily available texts that will become required reading in the fields of Atlantic and early American studies. The historical documents collected in this edition bring into focus the complex and compelling historical and literary interconnections between the U.

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